Publicaciones de la categoría: Vocab – intermedaite -FCE .1

Vocab – intermedaite -FCE 1

4 [transitive]book someone (for something)(informalto write down someone’s name and address because they have committed a crime or an offenseHe was booked for possession of cocaine.


____________________________

quell

 verb

/kwɛlquell pronunciation American

 

1quell something/someoneto stop something such as violent behavior or protestsExtra police were called in to quell the disturbances.(figurative)She started to giggle, but Bob quelled her with a look.2quell somethingto stop or reduce strong or unpleasant feelingssynonym calmto quell your fears______________________


4 [usually passive]haul someone (up) before someone/somethingto make someone appear in court in order to be judgedHe was hauled up before the local authorities for dangerous driving.drag  draw  haul  tow  tugThese words all mean to move something in a particular direction, especially toward or behind you.pull to hold something and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you: Pull the chair closer to the table. They use horses to pull their carts.drag to pull someone or something in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort: The sack is too heavy to lift—you’ll have to drag it.draw (formal) to move someone or something by pulling them/it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage: I drew my chair closer to the fire. horse-drawn carriagehaul to pull someone or something to a particular place with a lot of effort: Liz hauled her suitcase up the stairs.drag or haul?You usually drag something behind you along the ground; you usually haul something toward you, often upward toward you.Dragging something often needs effort, but hauling something always does.tow to pull a car, boat, or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain: Our car was towed away by the police.tug to pull someone or something hard in a particular direction: The boy tugged at his father’s sleeve.


PATTERNSto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something along/down/toward somethingto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something behind youto pull/drag/draw/haul a cart/sledto pull/draw a coach/carriageto pull/haul/tow a trailerhorses pull/draw/haul somethingdogs pull/drag/haul something______________________


barter

 verb

/ˈbɑrərbarter pronunciation American

[intransitivetransitive]

 
to exchange goods, property, services, etc. for other goods, etc. without using money

barter (with someone) (for something)The prisoners tried to barter with the guards for items like writing paper and books.barter something (for something)The local people bartered wheat for tools.barter noun [uncountable]The islanders use a system of barter instead of money.


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berserk

 adjective

/bərˈzərkbərˈsərkberserk pronunciation American

[not usually before noun]

 

1 very angry, often in a violent or uncontrolled wayHe went berserk when he found out where I was.2 very excitedThe kids were going berserk with excitement.____________________________________


allotment

 noun

/əˈlɑtməntallotment pronunciation American

[countableuncountable] (formal)

 
an amount of something that someone is given or allowed to have; the process of giving something to someone

Water allotments to farmers were cut back in the drought.the allotment of shares to company employees____________________________

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Vocab – intermedaite -FCE 1

4 [transitive]book someone (for something)(informalto write down someone’s name and address because they have committed a crime or an offenseHe was booked for possession of cocaine.


____________________________

quell

 verb

/kwɛlquell pronunciation American

 

1quell something/someoneto stop something such as violent behavior or protestsExtra police were called in to quell the disturbances.(figurative)She started to giggle, but Bob quelled her with a look.2quell somethingto stop or reduce strong or unpleasant feelingssynonym calmto quell your fears______________________


4 [usually passive]haul someone (up) before someone/somethingto make someone appear in court in order to be judgedHe was hauled up before the local authorities for dangerous driving.drag  draw  haul  tow  tugThese words all mean to move something in a particular direction, especially toward or behind you.pull to hold something and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you: Pull the chair closer to the table. They use horses to pull their carts.drag to pull someone or something in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort: The sack is too heavy to lift—you’ll have to drag it.draw (formal) to move someone or something by pulling them/it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage: I drew my chair closer to the fire. horse-drawn carriagehaul to pull someone or something to a particular place with a lot of effort: Liz hauled her suitcase up the stairs.drag or haul?You usually drag something behind you along the ground; you usually haul something toward you, often upward toward you.Dragging something often needs effort, but hauling something always does.tow to pull a car, boat, or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain: Our car was towed away by the police.tug to pull someone or something hard in a particular direction: The boy tugged at his father’s sleeve.


PATTERNSto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something along/down/toward somethingto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something behind youto pull/drag/draw/haul a cart/sledto pull/draw a coach/carriageto pull/haul/tow a trailerhorses pull/draw/haul somethingdogs pull/drag/haul something______________________


barter

 verb

/ˈbɑrərbarter pronunciation American

[intransitivetransitive]

 
to exchange goods, property, services, etc. for other goods, etc. without using money

barter (with someone) (for something)The prisoners tried to barter with the guards for items like writing paper and books.barter something (for something)The local people bartered wheat for tools.barter noun [uncountable]The islanders use a system of barter instead of money.


______________________________

berserk

 adjective

/bərˈzərkbərˈsərkberserk pronunciation American

[not usually before noun]

 

1 very angry, often in a violent or uncontrolled wayHe went berserk when he found out where I was.2 very excitedThe kids were going berserk with excitement.____________________________________


allotment

 noun

/əˈlɑtməntallotment pronunciation American

[countableuncountable] (formal)

 
an amount of something that someone is given or allowed to have; the process of giving something to someone

Water allotments to farmers were cut back in the drought.the allotment of shares to company employees____________________________

Vocab – intermedaite -FCE 1

4 [transitive]book someone (for something)(informalto write down someone’s name and address because they have committed a crime or an offenseHe was booked for possession of cocaine.


____________________________

quell

 verb

/kwɛlquell pronunciation American

 

1quell something/someoneto stop something such as violent behavior or protestsExtra police were called in to quell the disturbances.(figurative)She started to giggle, but Bob quelled her with a look.2quell somethingto stop or reduce strong or unpleasant feelingssynonym calmto quell your fears______________________


4 [usually passive]haul someone (up) before someone/somethingto make someone appear in court in order to be judgedHe was hauled up before the local authorities for dangerous driving.drag  draw  haul  tow  tugThese words all mean to move something in a particular direction, especially toward or behind you.pull to hold something and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you: Pull the chair closer to the table. They use horses to pull their carts.drag to pull someone or something in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort: The sack is too heavy to lift—you’ll have to drag it.draw (formal) to move someone or something by pulling them/it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage: I drew my chair closer to the fire. horse-drawn carriagehaul to pull someone or something to a particular place with a lot of effort: Liz hauled her suitcase up the stairs.drag or haul?You usually drag something behind you along the ground; you usually haul something toward you, often upward toward you.Dragging something often needs effort, but hauling something always does.tow to pull a car, boat, or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain: Our car was towed away by the police.tug to pull someone or something hard in a particular direction: The boy tugged at his father’s sleeve.


PATTERNSto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something along/down/toward somethingto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something behind youto pull/drag/draw/haul a cart/sledto pull/draw a coach/carriageto pull/haul/tow a trailerhorses pull/draw/haul somethingdogs pull/drag/haul something______________________


barter

 verb

/ˈbɑrərbarter pronunciation American

[intransitivetransitive]

 
to exchange goods, property, services, etc. for other goods, etc. without using money

barter (with someone) (for something)The prisoners tried to barter with the guards for items like writing paper and books.barter something (for something)The local people bartered wheat for tools.barter noun [uncountable]The islanders use a system of barter instead of money.


______________________________

berserk

 adjective

/bərˈzərkbərˈsərkberserk pronunciation American

[not usually before noun]

 

1 very angry, often in a violent or uncontrolled wayHe went berserk when he found out where I was.2 very excitedThe kids were going berserk with excitement.____________________________________


allotment

 noun

/əˈlɑtməntallotment pronunciation American

[countableuncountable] (formal)

 
an amount of something that someone is given or allowed to have; the process of giving something to someone

Water allotments to farmers were cut back in the drought.the allotment of shares to company employees____________________________

Vocab – intermedaite -FCE 1

4 [transitive]book someone (for something)(informalto write down someone’s name and address because they have committed a crime or an offenseHe was booked for possession of cocaine.


____________________________

quell

 verb

/kwɛlquell pronunciation American

 

1quell something/someoneto stop something such as violent behavior or protestsExtra police were called in to quell the disturbances.(figurative)She started to giggle, but Bob quelled her with a look.2quell somethingto stop or reduce strong or unpleasant feelingssynonym calmto quell your fears______________________


4 [usually passive]haul someone (up) before someone/somethingto make someone appear in court in order to be judgedHe was hauled up before the local authorities for dangerous driving.drag  draw  haul  tow  tugThese words all mean to move something in a particular direction, especially toward or behind you.pull to hold something and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you: Pull the chair closer to the table. They use horses to pull their carts.drag to pull someone or something in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort: The sack is too heavy to lift—you’ll have to drag it.draw (formal) to move someone or something by pulling them/it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage: I drew my chair closer to the fire. horse-drawn carriagehaul to pull someone or something to a particular place with a lot of effort: Liz hauled her suitcase up the stairs.drag or haul?You usually drag something behind you along the ground; you usually haul something toward you, often upward toward you.Dragging something often needs effort, but hauling something always does.tow to pull a car, boat, or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain: Our car was towed away by the police.tug to pull someone or something hard in a particular direction: The boy tugged at his father’s sleeve.


PATTERNSto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something along/down/toward somethingto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something behind youto pull/drag/draw/haul a cart/sledto pull/draw a coach/carriageto pull/haul/tow a trailerhorses pull/draw/haul somethingdogs pull/drag/haul something______________________


barter

 verb

/ˈbɑrərbarter pronunciation American

[intransitivetransitive]

 
to exchange goods, property, services, etc. for other goods, etc. without using money

barter (with someone) (for something)The prisoners tried to barter with the guards for items like writing paper and books.barter something (for something)The local people bartered wheat for tools.barter noun [uncountable]The islanders use a system of barter instead of money.


______________________________

berserk

 adjective

/bərˈzərkbərˈsərkberserk pronunciation American

[not usually before noun]

 

1 very angry, often in a violent or uncontrolled wayHe went berserk when he found out where I was.2 very excitedThe kids were going berserk with excitement.____________________________________


allotment

 noun

/əˈlɑtməntallotment pronunciation American

[countableuncountable] (formal)

 
an amount of something that someone is given or allowed to have; the process of giving something to someone

Water allotments to farmers were cut back in the drought.the allotment of shares to company employees____________________________

Vocab – intermedaite -FCE 1

4 [transitive]book someone (for something)(informalto write down someone’s name and address because they have committed a crime or an offenseHe was booked for possession of cocaine.


____________________________

quell

 verb

/kwɛlquell pronunciation American

 

1quell something/someoneto stop something such as violent behavior or protestsExtra police were called in to quell the disturbances.(figurative)She started to giggle, but Bob quelled her with a look.2quell somethingto stop or reduce strong or unpleasant feelingssynonym calmto quell your fears______________________


4 [usually passive]haul someone (up) before someone/somethingto make someone appear in court in order to be judgedHe was hauled up before the local authorities for dangerous driving.drag  draw  haul  tow  tugThese words all mean to move something in a particular direction, especially toward or behind you.pull to hold something and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you: Pull the chair closer to the table. They use horses to pull their carts.drag to pull someone or something in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort: The sack is too heavy to lift—you’ll have to drag it.draw (formal) to move someone or something by pulling them/it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage: I drew my chair closer to the fire. horse-drawn carriagehaul to pull someone or something to a particular place with a lot of effort: Liz hauled her suitcase up the stairs.drag or haul?You usually drag something behind you along the ground; you usually haul something toward you, often upward toward you.Dragging something often needs effort, but hauling something always does.tow to pull a car, boat, or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain: Our car was towed away by the police.tug to pull someone or something hard in a particular direction: The boy tugged at his father’s sleeve.


PATTERNSto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something along/down/toward somethingto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something behind youto pull/drag/draw/haul a cart/sledto pull/draw a coach/carriageto pull/haul/tow a trailerhorses pull/draw/haul somethingdogs pull/drag/haul something______________________


barter

 verb

/ˈbɑrərbarter pronunciation American

[intransitivetransitive]

 
to exchange goods, property, services, etc. for other goods, etc. without using money

barter (with someone) (for something)The prisoners tried to barter with the guards for items like writing paper and books.barter something (for something)The local people bartered wheat for tools.barter noun [uncountable]The islanders use a system of barter instead of money.


______________________________

berserk

 adjective

/bərˈzərkbərˈsərkberserk pronunciation American

[not usually before noun]

 

1 very angry, often in a violent or uncontrolled wayHe went berserk when he found out where I was.2 very excitedThe kids were going berserk with excitement.____________________________________


allotment

 noun

/əˈlɑtməntallotment pronunciation American

[countableuncountable] (formal)

 
an amount of something that someone is given or allowed to have; the process of giving something to someone

Water allotments to farmers were cut back in the drought.the allotment of shares to company employees____________________________

Vocab – intermedaite -FCE 1

4 [transitive]book someone (for something)(informalto write down someone’s name and address because they have committed a crime or an offenseHe was booked for possession of cocaine.


____________________________

quell

 verb

/kwɛlquell pronunciation American

 

1quell something/someoneto stop something such as violent behavior or protestsExtra police were called in to quell the disturbances.(figurative)She started to giggle, but Bob quelled her with a look.2quell somethingto stop or reduce strong or unpleasant feelingssynonym calmto quell your fears______________________


4 [usually passive]haul someone (up) before someone/somethingto make someone appear in court in order to be judgedHe was hauled up before the local authorities for dangerous driving.drag  draw  haul  tow  tugThese words all mean to move something in a particular direction, especially toward or behind you.pull to hold something and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you: Pull the chair closer to the table. They use horses to pull their carts.drag to pull someone or something in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort: The sack is too heavy to lift—you’ll have to drag it.draw (formal) to move someone or something by pulling them/it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage: I drew my chair closer to the fire. horse-drawn carriagehaul to pull someone or something to a particular place with a lot of effort: Liz hauled her suitcase up the stairs.drag or haul?You usually drag something behind you along the ground; you usually haul something toward you, often upward toward you.Dragging something often needs effort, but hauling something always does.tow to pull a car, boat, or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain: Our car was towed away by the police.tug to pull someone or something hard in a particular direction: The boy tugged at his father’s sleeve.


PATTERNSto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something along/down/toward somethingto pull/drag/draw/haul/tow someone/something behind youto pull/drag/draw/haul a cart/sledto pull/draw a coach/carriageto pull/haul/tow a trailerhorses pull/draw/haul somethingdogs pull/drag/haul something______________________


barter

 verb

/ˈbɑrərbarter pronunciation American

[intransitivetransitive]

 
to exchange goods, property, services, etc. for other goods, etc. without using money

barter (with someone) (for something)The prisoners tried to barter with the guards for items like writing paper and books.barter something (for something)The local people bartered wheat for tools.barter noun [uncountable]The islanders use a system of barter instead of money.


______________________________

berserk

 adjective

/bərˈzərkbərˈsərkberserk pronunciation American

[not usually before noun]

 

1 very angry, often in a violent or uncontrolled wayHe went berserk when he found out where I was.2 very excitedThe kids were going berserk with excitement.____________________________________


allotment

 noun

/əˈlɑtməntallotment pronunciation American

[countableuncountable] (formal)

 
an amount of something that someone is given or allowed to have; the process of giving something to someone

Water allotments to farmers were cut back in the drought.the allotment of shares to company employees____________________________

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