Publicaciones de la categoría: This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

The demonstrative adjectives–this/that/these/those–tell us where an object is located and how many objects there are.
This/ThatThis and that are used to point to one object. This points to something nearby whilethat points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.
These/ThoseThese and those refer to more than one object. These points to things nearby while those points to things “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.
Posted on Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010 at 9:09 am

This/That, These/Those, Than/Then

This/That
This and that are singular. This points to something nearby while that points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.

These/ Those
These and those are plural. These points to something nearby while those points to something “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.
Than/ Then
Use than to show comparison. Use then to answer the question when.
Examples: I would rather go skiing than rock climbing.
First we went skiing; then we went rock climbing.
Pop Quiz
1. This/these tables need to be cleaned before customers arrive.
2. Please clean this/that table in the corner.
3. These/those clothes in the other room need to be folded.
4. That/those toaster burned my bagel.
5. We reached the summit of the mountain and then/than collapsed.
6. I would rather starve then/than eat oysters.
Quiz Answers
1. These tables need to be cleaned before customers arrive.
2. Please clean that table in the corner.
3. Those clothes in the other room need to be folded.
4. That toaster burned my bagel.
5. We reached the summit of the mountain and then collapsed.
6. I would rather starve than eat oysters.

Posted on Friday, July 18th, 2008 at 5:48 pm

Adjectives and Adverbs: When to use -ly

Do you wonder when to add -ly to a word? For example, should you say, “He speaks slow” or “He speaks slowly.” What about, “He speaks slower than his brother.” Is this correct? Let’s find out.
Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns. They may come before the word they describe: “That is a cute puppy.” Adjectives may also follow the word they describe: “That puppy is cute.”
Adverbs modify adjectives, verbs, and other adverbs. If an adverb answers how and can have an -ly attached to it, place it there.
Example: She thinks slow/slowly. Slowly answers how she thinks.

Example:
 We performed bad/badly. Badly answers how we performed.
Example: She thinks fast/fastly. Even though fast answers how she thinks, there is no such word as fastly.
Rule: When comparing, don’t drop the —ly. Simply add more or less.
Example: Answer the questions more quickly/quicker to win the prize.
Rule: English grammar has one tricky caveat that seems like an exception to these easy rules: If the verb is one of these four senses–taste, smell, look, feel–don’t ask how. Instead, ask if the sense verb is used actively. If so, attach the -ly. If the sense verb is not used actively, which is more common, don’t attach -ly.
Example: Roses smell sweet/sweetly. Do roses actively smell with noses? No, so no -ly.

Example:
 The woman looked angry/angrily. Is the woman actively looking with eyes? No, only her appearance is being described.
Example: She feels bad/badly about the news. She is not feeling with fingers so no -ly.

Example:
 She feels bad/badly since burning her fingers.

Pop Quiz
1. I feel bad/badly about telling that secret.
2. Walk slower/more slowly, please.
3. You look sad/sadly about the news.
Answers
1. bad
2. more slowly
3. sad
Posted on Sunday, October 7th, 2007 at 11:09 pm

Different From vs. Different Than

The expressions different from and different than have been used almost interchangeably for at least 300 years.

Different from
 is preferred to introduce a phrase; however, different than may also be used.
Example: New Orleans natives’ speech is different from New York natives’ speech.
Example: New Orleans natives’ speech is different than New York natives’ speech.
Different than is preferred to introduce a clause; however, different from may be used if more words are added.
Example: The boulevard led to a different street than the map showed.
Example: The boulevard led to a different street from the one the map showed.

Differently
 is used as an adverb. Use differently than with a clause following. You may usedifferently from if you add extra wording.
Example: He walked differently than he had hoped after getting the leg cast off.
Example: He walked differently from what he had hoped after getting the leg cast off.
Quiz
Choose the preferred or correct word in each sentence.
1. This dress is different from/than the one in the catalog.
2. How is this salad dressing different from/than last night’s dressing?
3. His moustache made him look different from/than his brothers.
4. Chopsticks are very different to hold from/than a fork and knife are.
5. He treated me differently from/than I would have expected.
6. He treated me differently from/than what I would have expected.
Answers
1. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
2. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
3. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
4. different than (preferred because it introduces a clause)
5. differently than
6. differently from
Posted on Friday, July 6th, 2007 at 2:46 pm

Good vs. Well

Good is an adjective while well is an adverb answering the question how.
Examples:
You did a good job.
Good describes job, which is a noun, so good is an adjective.
You did the job well.
Well answers how the job was performed.

Rule:
 With the four senses–look, smell, taste, feel–discern if these words are being used actively to decide whether to follow them with good or well.
Examples:
You smell good today.
Good describes you, not how you sniff with your nose.
You smell well for someone with a cold.
You are sniffing actively with your nose here so use the adverb.
She looks good for a 75-year-old grandmother.
She is not looking actively with eyes so use the adjective.
Rule: When referring to health, always use well.
Examples:
I do not feel well today.
You do not look well.
Rule: When describing someone’s emotional state, use good.
Example: He doesn’t feel good about having cheated.
So, how should you answer the question, “How are you?” If you think someone is asking about your physical well-being, answer, “I feel well,” or “I don’t feel well.” If someone is asking about your emotional state, answer, “I feel good,” or “I don’t feel good.” To get around this problem, you could answer, “I feel fine,” “I feel great,” or “I feel sick.”
Quiz
1. She jogged very good/well for her age.
2. She had a good/well time yesterday.
3. With a high fever, it is unlikely he will feel good/well enough to play basketball tomorrow.
4. Those glasses look good/well on you.
Answers
1. well
2. good
3. well
4. good
Posted on Friday, April 6th, 2007 at 11:07 pm


This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

The demonstrative adjectives–this/that/these/those–tell us where an object is located and how many objects there are.
This/ThatThis and that are used to point to one object. This points to something nearby whilethat points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.
These/ThoseThese and those refer to more than one object. These points to things nearby while those points to things “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.
Posted on Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010 at 9:09 am

This/That, These/Those, Than/Then

This/That
This and that are singular. This points to something nearby while that points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.

These/ Those
These and those are plural. These points to something nearby while those points to something “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.
Than/ Then
Use than to show comparison. Use then to answer the question when.
Examples: I would rather go skiing than rock climbing.
First we went skiing; then we went rock climbing.
Pop Quiz
1. This/these tables need to be cleaned before customers arrive.
2. Please clean this/that table in the corner.
3. These/those clothes in the other room need to be folded.
4. That/those toaster burned my bagel.
5. We reached the summit of the mountain and then/than collapsed.
6. I would rather starve then/than eat oysters.
Quiz Answers
1. These tables need to be cleaned before customers arrive.
2. Please clean that table in the corner.
3. Those clothes in the other room need to be folded.
4. That toaster burned my bagel.
5. We reached the summit of the mountain and then collapsed.
6. I would rather starve than eat oysters.

Posted on Friday, July 18th, 2008 at 5:48 pm

Adjectives and Adverbs: When to use -ly

Do you wonder when to add -ly to a word? For example, should you say, “He speaks slow” or “He speaks slowly.” What about, “He speaks slower than his brother.” Is this correct? Let’s find out.
Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns. They may come before the word they describe: “That is a cute puppy.” Adjectives may also follow the word they describe: “That puppy is cute.”
Adverbs modify adjectives, verbs, and other adverbs. If an adverb answers how and can have an -ly attached to it, place it there.
Example: She thinks slow/slowly. Slowly answers how she thinks.

Example:
 We performed bad/badly. Badly answers how we performed.
Example: She thinks fast/fastly. Even though fast answers how she thinks, there is no such word as fastly.
Rule: When comparing, don’t drop the —ly. Simply add more or less.
Example: Answer the questions more quickly/quicker to win the prize.
Rule: English grammar has one tricky caveat that seems like an exception to these easy rules: If the verb is one of these four senses–taste, smell, look, feel–don’t ask how. Instead, ask if the sense verb is used actively. If so, attach the -ly. If the sense verb is not used actively, which is more common, don’t attach -ly.
Example: Roses smell sweet/sweetly. Do roses actively smell with noses? No, so no -ly.

Example:
 The woman looked angry/angrily. Is the woman actively looking with eyes? No, only her appearance is being described.
Example: She feels bad/badly about the news. She is not feeling with fingers so no -ly.

Example:
 She feels bad/badly since burning her fingers.

Pop Quiz
1. I feel bad/badly about telling that secret.
2. Walk slower/more slowly, please.
3. You look sad/sadly about the news.
Answers
1. bad
2. more slowly
3. sad
Posted on Sunday, October 7th, 2007 at 11:09 pm

Different From vs. Different Than

The expressions different from and different than have been used almost interchangeably for at least 300 years.

Different from
 is preferred to introduce a phrase; however, different than may also be used.
Example: New Orleans natives’ speech is different from New York natives’ speech.
Example: New Orleans natives’ speech is different than New York natives’ speech.
Different than is preferred to introduce a clause; however, different from may be used if more words are added.
Example: The boulevard led to a different street than the map showed.
Example: The boulevard led to a different street from the one the map showed.

Differently
 is used as an adverb. Use differently than with a clause following. You may usedifferently from if you add extra wording.
Example: He walked differently than he had hoped after getting the leg cast off.
Example: He walked differently from what he had hoped after getting the leg cast off.
Quiz
Choose the preferred or correct word in each sentence.
1. This dress is different from/than the one in the catalog.
2. How is this salad dressing different from/than last night’s dressing?
3. His moustache made him look different from/than his brothers.
4. Chopsticks are very different to hold from/than a fork and knife are.
5. He treated me differently from/than I would have expected.
6. He treated me differently from/than what I would have expected.
Answers
1. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
2. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
3. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
4. different than (preferred because it introduces a clause)
5. differently than
6. differently from
Posted on Friday, July 6th, 2007 at 2:46 pm

Good vs. Well

Good is an adjective while well is an adverb answering the question how.
Examples:
You did a good job.
Good describes job, which is a noun, so good is an adjective.
You did the job well.
Well answers how the job was performed.

Rule:
 With the four senses–look, smell, taste, feel–discern if these words are being used actively to decide whether to follow them with good or well.
Examples:
You smell good today.
Good describes you, not how you sniff with your nose.
You smell well for someone with a cold.
You are sniffing actively with your nose here so use the adverb.
She looks good for a 75-year-old grandmother.
She is not looking actively with eyes so use the adjective.
Rule: When referring to health, always use well.
Examples:
I do not feel well today.
You do not look well.
Rule: When describing someone’s emotional state, use good.
Example: He doesn’t feel good about having cheated.
So, how should you answer the question, “How are you?” If you think someone is asking about your physical well-being, answer, “I feel well,” or “I don’t feel well.” If someone is asking about your emotional state, answer, “I feel good,” or “I don’t feel good.” To get around this problem, you could answer, “I feel fine,” “I feel great,” or “I feel sick.”
Quiz
1. She jogged very good/well for her age.
2. She had a good/well time yesterday.
3. With a high fever, it is unlikely he will feel good/well enough to play basketball tomorrow.
4. Those glasses look good/well on you.
Answers
1. well
2. good
3. well
4. good
Posted on Friday, April 6th, 2007 at 11:07 pm


This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

The demonstrative adjectives–this/that/these/those–tell us where an object is located and how many objects there are.
This/ThatThis and that are used to point to one object. This points to something nearby whilethat points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.
These/ThoseThese and those refer to more than one object. These points to things nearby while those points to things “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.
Posted on Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010 at 9:09 am

This/That, These/Those, Than/Then

This/That
This and that are singular. This points to something nearby while that points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.

These/ Those
These and those are plural. These points to something nearby while those points to something “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.
Than/ Then
Use than to show comparison. Use then to answer the question when.
Examples: I would rather go skiing than rock climbing.
First we went skiing; then we went rock climbing.
Pop Quiz
1. This/these tables need to be cleaned before customers arrive.
2. Please clean this/that table in the corner.
3. These/those clothes in the other room need to be folded.
4. That/those toaster burned my bagel.
5. We reached the summit of the mountain and then/than collapsed.
6. I would rather starve then/than eat oysters.
Quiz Answers
1. These tables need to be cleaned before customers arrive.
2. Please clean that table in the corner.
3. Those clothes in the other room need to be folded.
4. That toaster burned my bagel.
5. We reached the summit of the mountain and then collapsed.
6. I would rather starve than eat oysters.

Posted on Friday, July 18th, 2008 at 5:48 pm

Adjectives and Adverbs: When to use -ly

Do you wonder when to add -ly to a word? For example, should you say, “He speaks slow” or “He speaks slowly.” What about, “He speaks slower than his brother.” Is this correct? Let’s find out.
Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns. They may come before the word they describe: “That is a cute puppy.” Adjectives may also follow the word they describe: “That puppy is cute.”
Adverbs modify adjectives, verbs, and other adverbs. If an adverb answers how and can have an -ly attached to it, place it there.
Example: She thinks slow/slowly. Slowly answers how she thinks.

Example:
 We performed bad/badly. Badly answers how we performed.
Example: She thinks fast/fastly. Even though fast answers how she thinks, there is no such word as fastly.
Rule: When comparing, don’t drop the —ly. Simply add more or less.
Example: Answer the questions more quickly/quicker to win the prize.
Rule: English grammar has one tricky caveat that seems like an exception to these easy rules: If the verb is one of these four senses–taste, smell, look, feel–don’t ask how. Instead, ask if the sense verb is used actively. If so, attach the -ly. If the sense verb is not used actively, which is more common, don’t attach -ly.
Example: Roses smell sweet/sweetly. Do roses actively smell with noses? No, so no -ly.

Example:
 The woman looked angry/angrily. Is the woman actively looking with eyes? No, only her appearance is being described.
Example: She feels bad/badly about the news. She is not feeling with fingers so no -ly.

Example:
 She feels bad/badly since burning her fingers.

Pop Quiz
1. I feel bad/badly about telling that secret.
2. Walk slower/more slowly, please.
3. You look sad/sadly about the news.
Answers
1. bad
2. more slowly
3. sad
Posted on Sunday, October 7th, 2007 at 11:09 pm

Different From vs. Different Than

The expressions different from and different than have been used almost interchangeably for at least 300 years.

Different from
 is preferred to introduce a phrase; however, different than may also be used.
Example: New Orleans natives’ speech is different from New York natives’ speech.
Example: New Orleans natives’ speech is different than New York natives’ speech.
Different than is preferred to introduce a clause; however, different from may be used if more words are added.
Example: The boulevard led to a different street than the map showed.
Example: The boulevard led to a different street from the one the map showed.

Differently
 is used as an adverb. Use differently than with a clause following. You may usedifferently from if you add extra wording.
Example: He walked differently than he had hoped after getting the leg cast off.
Example: He walked differently from what he had hoped after getting the leg cast off.
Quiz
Choose the preferred or correct word in each sentence.
1. This dress is different from/than the one in the catalog.
2. How is this salad dressing different from/than last night’s dressing?
3. His moustache made him look different from/than his brothers.
4. Chopsticks are very different to hold from/than a fork and knife are.
5. He treated me differently from/than I would have expected.
6. He treated me differently from/than what I would have expected.
Answers
1. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
2. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
3. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
4. different than (preferred because it introduces a clause)
5. differently than
6. differently from
Posted on Friday, July 6th, 2007 at 2:46 pm

Good vs. Well

Good is an adjective while well is an adverb answering the question how.
Examples:
You did a good job.
Good describes job, which is a noun, so good is an adjective.
You did the job well.
Well answers how the job was performed.

Rule:
 With the four senses–look, smell, taste, feel–discern if these words are being used actively to decide whether to follow them with good or well.
Examples:
You smell good today.
Good describes you, not how you sniff with your nose.
You smell well for someone with a cold.
You are sniffing actively with your nose here so use the adverb.
She looks good for a 75-year-old grandmother.
She is not looking actively with eyes so use the adjective.
Rule: When referring to health, always use well.
Examples:
I do not feel well today.
You do not look well.
Rule: When describing someone’s emotional state, use good.
Example: He doesn’t feel good about having cheated.
So, how should you answer the question, “How are you?” If you think someone is asking about your physical well-being, answer, “I feel well,” or “I don’t feel well.” If someone is asking about your emotional state, answer, “I feel good,” or “I don’t feel good.” To get around this problem, you could answer, “I feel fine,” “I feel great,” or “I feel sick.”
Quiz
1. She jogged very good/well for her age.
2. She had a good/well time yesterday.
3. With a high fever, it is unlikely he will feel good/well enough to play basketball tomorrow.
4. Those glasses look good/well on you.
Answers
1. well
2. good
3. well
4. good
Posted on Friday, April 6th, 2007 at 11:07 pm


This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

This/That/These/Those – Demonstrative Adjectives

The demonstrative adjectives–this/that/these/those–tell us where an object is located and how many objects there are.
This/ThatThis and that are used to point to one object. This points to something nearby whilethat points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.
These/ThoseThese and those refer to more than one object. These points to things nearby while those points to things “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.
Posted on Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010 at 9:09 am

This/That, These/Those, Than/Then

This/That
This and that are singular. This points to something nearby while that points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.

These/ Those
These and those are plural. These points to something nearby while those points to something “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.
Than/ Then
Use than to show comparison. Use then to answer the question when.
Examples: I would rather go skiing than rock climbing.
First we went skiing; then we went rock climbing.
Pop Quiz
1. This/these tables need to be cleaned before customers arrive.
2. Please clean this/that table in the corner.
3. These/those clothes in the other room need to be folded.
4. That/those toaster burned my bagel.
5. We reached the summit of the mountain and then/than collapsed.
6. I would rather starve then/than eat oysters.
Quiz Answers
1. These tables need to be cleaned before customers arrive.
2. Please clean that table in the corner.
3. Those clothes in the other room need to be folded.
4. That toaster burned my bagel.
5. We reached the summit of the mountain and then collapsed.
6. I would rather starve than eat oysters.

Posted on Friday, July 18th, 2008 at 5:48 pm

Adjectives and Adverbs: When to use -ly

Do you wonder when to add -ly to a word? For example, should you say, “He speaks slow” or “He speaks slowly.” What about, “He speaks slower than his brother.” Is this correct? Let’s find out.
Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns. They may come before the word they describe: “That is a cute puppy.” Adjectives may also follow the word they describe: “That puppy is cute.”
Adverbs modify adjectives, verbs, and other adverbs. If an adverb answers how and can have an -ly attached to it, place it there.
Example: She thinks slow/slowly. Slowly answers how she thinks.

Example:
 We performed bad/badly. Badly answers how we performed.
Example: She thinks fast/fastly. Even though fast answers how she thinks, there is no such word as fastly.
Rule: When comparing, don’t drop the —ly. Simply add more or less.
Example: Answer the questions more quickly/quicker to win the prize.
Rule: English grammar has one tricky caveat that seems like an exception to these easy rules: If the verb is one of these four senses–taste, smell, look, feel–don’t ask how. Instead, ask if the sense verb is used actively. If so, attach the -ly. If the sense verb is not used actively, which is more common, don’t attach -ly.
Example: Roses smell sweet/sweetly. Do roses actively smell with noses? No, so no -ly.

Example:
 The woman looked angry/angrily. Is the woman actively looking with eyes? No, only her appearance is being described.
Example: She feels bad/badly about the news. She is not feeling with fingers so no -ly.

Example:
 She feels bad/badly since burning her fingers.

Pop Quiz
1. I feel bad/badly about telling that secret.
2. Walk slower/more slowly, please.
3. You look sad/sadly about the news.
Answers
1. bad
2. more slowly
3. sad
Posted on Sunday, October 7th, 2007 at 11:09 pm

Different From vs. Different Than

The expressions different from and different than have been used almost interchangeably for at least 300 years.

Different from
 is preferred to introduce a phrase; however, different than may also be used.
Example: New Orleans natives’ speech is different from New York natives’ speech.
Example: New Orleans natives’ speech is different than New York natives’ speech.
Different than is preferred to introduce a clause; however, different from may be used if more words are added.
Example: The boulevard led to a different street than the map showed.
Example: The boulevard led to a different street from the one the map showed.

Differently
 is used as an adverb. Use differently than with a clause following. You may usedifferently from if you add extra wording.
Example: He walked differently than he had hoped after getting the leg cast off.
Example: He walked differently from what he had hoped after getting the leg cast off.
Quiz
Choose the preferred or correct word in each sentence.
1. This dress is different from/than the one in the catalog.
2. How is this salad dressing different from/than last night’s dressing?
3. His moustache made him look different from/than his brothers.
4. Chopsticks are very different to hold from/than a fork and knife are.
5. He treated me differently from/than I would have expected.
6. He treated me differently from/than what I would have expected.
Answers
1. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
2. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
3. different from (preferred because it introduces a phrase)
4. different than (preferred because it introduces a clause)
5. differently than
6. differently from
Posted on Friday, July 6th, 2007 at 2:46 pm

Good vs. Well

Good is an adjective while well is an adverb answering the question how.
Examples:
You did a good job.
Good describes job, which is a noun, so good is an adjective.
You did the job well.
Well answers how the job was performed.

Rule:
 With the four senses–look, smell, taste, feel–discern if these words are being used actively to decide whether to follow them with good or well.
Examples:
You smell good today.
Good describes you, not how you sniff with your nose.
You smell well for someone with a cold.
You are sniffing actively with your nose here so use the adverb.
She looks good for a 75-year-old grandmother.
She is not looking actively with eyes so use the adjective.
Rule: When referring to health, always use well.
Examples:
I do not feel well today.
You do not look well.
Rule: When describing someone’s emotional state, use good.
Example: He doesn’t feel good about having cheated.
So, how should you answer the question, “How are you?” If you think someone is asking about your physical well-being, answer, “I feel well,” or “I don’t feel well.” If someone is asking about your emotional state, answer, “I feel good,” or “I don’t feel good.” To get around this problem, you could answer, “I feel fine,” “I feel great,” or “I feel sick.”
Quiz
1. She jogged very good/well for her age.
2. She had a good/well time yesterday.
3. With a high fever, it is unlikely he will feel good/well enough to play basketball tomorrow.
4. Those glasses look good/well on you.
Answers
1. well
2. good
3. well
4. good
Posted on Friday, April 6th, 2007 at 11:07 pm


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