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The Exclamation Mark

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

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The Exclamation Mark

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

The Exclamation Mark

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

The Exclamation Mark

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

The Exclamation Mark

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

The Exclamation Mark

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

breathe

breathe Listen to audio/ˈbri:ð/ verb

breathes; breathed; breath·ing

1 : to move air into and out of your lungs : to inhale and exhale [no obj] Relax and breathe deeply. He was breathing hard from running. The patient suddenly stopped breathing. I can hardly breathe with all this smoke. [+ obj] He wants to live where he can breathe clean/fresh air.

2 a : to send (something) out from your lungs through your mouth or nose [+ obj] a dragon that breathes fireoften + out breathing out [=exhaling] carbon dioxide [no obj] He breathed [=blew] on the glass and wiped it clean.often + out Breathe out through your nose.
b : to take (something) into your lungs through your mouth or nose [+ obj] You shouldn’t be breathing [=inhaling] those fumes. People usually contract the virus by breathing contaminated air.often + in You shouldn’t be breathing in those fumes. [no obj] Breathe deeply and then exhale.usually + in Breathe in through your nose.

3 [no obj] : to be alive
I’ll never give up as long as I’m still breathing. a living, breathing human being

4 [no obj] : to pause and rest before continuing
We had barely stopped to breathe before we were on the go again.

5 [+ obj] : to bring (something) into a thing
City leaders hope the project will breathe vitality/energy into the downtown. Their leadership breathed new life into the movement. [=gave new energy to the movement]

6 [no obj] : to feel able to think or act freely
I need some room to breathe. = I need some breathing room/space.

7 [no obj] a : to allow air to pass through
a fabric that breathes
b : to be cooled or refreshed by air that passes through clothing
Cotton clothing lets your skin breathe.

8 [+ obj] : to say (something) very quietly
It’s beautiful, she breathed.usually used in the phrase breathe a word Don’t breathe a word of/about this to anyone! [=do not say anything about this to anyone]

9 [no obj] of wine : to develop a better flavor because of contact with air
Open the bottle a few minutes before you want to drink it so that the wine can breathe.

breathe a sigh of relief

: to relax because something you have been worrying about is not a problem or danger anymore : to feel relieved
We all breathed a sigh of relief when we heard that they were safe.
breathe down someone’s neck

1 : to chase after someone closely
The cops were breathing down our necks.

2 : to watch someone carefully and constantly
His parents are always breathing down his neck.

breathe easy or breathe easier or breathe easily or breathe freely

: to feel relief from pressure, danger, etc.
I’ll breathe easier once this whole ordeal is over. You can breathe easy knowing that your children are safe.
breathe your lastsee 4last
live and breathe

If you live and breathe something, you spend a great deal of time, thought, or effort on that thing.
She lives and breathes music. They live and breathe their work.
breath·able Listen to audio /ˈbri:ðəbəl/ adjective [more breathable; most breathable]
a breathable fabric [=a fabric that allows air to pass through]
— breathing noun [noncount]
Her breathing is heavy/shallow/labored.often used before another noun We’ll begin with some breathing exercises. He has breathing problems.see also heavy breathing at 1heavy

breathe

breathe Listen to audio/ˈbri:ð/ verb

breathes; breathed; breath·ing

1 : to move air into and out of your lungs : to inhale and exhale [no obj] Relax and breathe deeply. He was breathing hard from running. The patient suddenly stopped breathing. I can hardly breathe with all this smoke. [+ obj] He wants to live where he can breathe clean/fresh air.

2 a : to send (something) out from your lungs through your mouth or nose [+ obj] a dragon that breathes fireoften + out breathing out [=exhaling] carbon dioxide [no obj] He breathed [=blew] on the glass and wiped it clean.often + out Breathe out through your nose.
b : to take (something) into your lungs through your mouth or nose [+ obj] You shouldn’t be breathing [=inhaling] those fumes. People usually contract the virus by breathing contaminated air.often + in You shouldn’t be breathing in those fumes. [no obj] Breathe deeply and then exhale.usually + in Breathe in through your nose.

3 [no obj] : to be alive
I’ll never give up as long as I’m still breathing. a living, breathing human being

4 [no obj] : to pause and rest before continuing
We had barely stopped to breathe before we were on the go again.

5 [+ obj] : to bring (something) into a thing
City leaders hope the project will breathe vitality/energy into the downtown. Their leadership breathed new life into the movement. [=gave new energy to the movement]

6 [no obj] : to feel able to think or act freely
I need some room to breathe. = I need some breathing room/space.

7 [no obj] a : to allow air to pass through
a fabric that breathes
b : to be cooled or refreshed by air that passes through clothing
Cotton clothing lets your skin breathe.

8 [+ obj] : to say (something) very quietly
It’s beautiful, she breathed.usually used in the phrase breathe a word Don’t breathe a word of/about this to anyone! [=do not say anything about this to anyone]

9 [no obj] of wine : to develop a better flavor because of contact with air
Open the bottle a few minutes before you want to drink it so that the wine can breathe.

breathe a sigh of relief

: to relax because something you have been worrying about is not a problem or danger anymore : to feel relieved
We all breathed a sigh of relief when we heard that they were safe.
breathe down someone’s neck

1 : to chase after someone closely
The cops were breathing down our necks.

2 : to watch someone carefully and constantly
His parents are always breathing down his neck.

breathe easy or breathe easier or breathe easily or breathe freely

: to feel relief from pressure, danger, etc.
I’ll breathe easier once this whole ordeal is over. You can breathe easy knowing that your children are safe.
breathe your lastsee 4last
live and breathe

If you live and breathe something, you spend a great deal of time, thought, or effort on that thing.
She lives and breathes music. They live and breathe their work.
breath·able Listen to audio /ˈbri:ðəbəl/ adjective [more breathable; most breathable]
a breathable fabric [=a fabric that allows air to pass through]
— breathing noun [noncount]
Her breathing is heavy/shallow/labored.often used before another noun We’ll begin with some breathing exercises. He has breathing problems.see also heavy breathing at 1heavy

breathe

breathe Listen to audio/ˈbri:ð/ verb

breathes; breathed; breath·ing

1 : to move air into and out of your lungs : to inhale and exhale [no obj] Relax and breathe deeply. He was breathing hard from running. The patient suddenly stopped breathing. I can hardly breathe with all this smoke. [+ obj] He wants to live where he can breathe clean/fresh air.

2 a : to send (something) out from your lungs through your mouth or nose [+ obj] a dragon that breathes fireoften + out breathing out [=exhaling] carbon dioxide [no obj] He breathed [=blew] on the glass and wiped it clean.often + out Breathe out through your nose.
b : to take (something) into your lungs through your mouth or nose [+ obj] You shouldn’t be breathing [=inhaling] those fumes. People usually contract the virus by breathing contaminated air.often + in You shouldn’t be breathing in those fumes. [no obj] Breathe deeply and then exhale.usually + in Breathe in through your nose.

3 [no obj] : to be alive
I’ll never give up as long as I’m still breathing. a living, breathing human being

4 [no obj] : to pause and rest before continuing
We had barely stopped to breathe before we were on the go again.

5 [+ obj] : to bring (something) into a thing
City leaders hope the project will breathe vitality/energy into the downtown. Their leadership breathed new life into the movement. [=gave new energy to the movement]

6 [no obj] : to feel able to think or act freely
I need some room to breathe. = I need some breathing room/space.

7 [no obj] a : to allow air to pass through
a fabric that breathes
b : to be cooled or refreshed by air that passes through clothing
Cotton clothing lets your skin breathe.

8 [+ obj] : to say (something) very quietly
It’s beautiful, she breathed.usually used in the phrase breathe a word Don’t breathe a word of/about this to anyone! [=do not say anything about this to anyone]

9 [no obj] of wine : to develop a better flavor because of contact with air
Open the bottle a few minutes before you want to drink it so that the wine can breathe.

breathe a sigh of relief

: to relax because something you have been worrying about is not a problem or danger anymore : to feel relieved
We all breathed a sigh of relief when we heard that they were safe.
breathe down someone’s neck

1 : to chase after someone closely
The cops were breathing down our necks.

2 : to watch someone carefully and constantly
His parents are always breathing down his neck.

breathe easy or breathe easier or breathe easily or breathe freely

: to feel relief from pressure, danger, etc.
I’ll breathe easier once this whole ordeal is over. You can breathe easy knowing that your children are safe.
breathe your lastsee 4last
live and breathe

If you live and breathe something, you spend a great deal of time, thought, or effort on that thing.
She lives and breathes music. They live and breathe their work.
breath·able Listen to audio /ˈbri:ðəbəl/ adjective [more breathable; most breathable]
a breathable fabric [=a fabric that allows air to pass through]
— breathing noun [noncount]
Her breathing is heavy/shallow/labored.often used before another noun We’ll begin with some breathing exercises. He has breathing problems.see also heavy breathing at 1heavy

breathe

breathe Listen to audio/ˈbri:ð/ verb

breathes; breathed; breath·ing

1 : to move air into and out of your lungs : to inhale and exhale [no obj] Relax and breathe deeply. He was breathing hard from running. The patient suddenly stopped breathing. I can hardly breathe with all this smoke. [+ obj] He wants to live where he can breathe clean/fresh air.

2 a : to send (something) out from your lungs through your mouth or nose [+ obj] a dragon that breathes fireoften + out breathing out [=exhaling] carbon dioxide [no obj] He breathed [=blew] on the glass and wiped it clean.often + out Breathe out through your nose.
b : to take (something) into your lungs through your mouth or nose [+ obj] You shouldn’t be breathing [=inhaling] those fumes. People usually contract the virus by breathing contaminated air.often + in You shouldn’t be breathing in those fumes. [no obj] Breathe deeply and then exhale.usually + in Breathe in through your nose.

3 [no obj] : to be alive
I’ll never give up as long as I’m still breathing. a living, breathing human being

4 [no obj] : to pause and rest before continuing
We had barely stopped to breathe before we were on the go again.

5 [+ obj] : to bring (something) into a thing
City leaders hope the project will breathe vitality/energy into the downtown. Their leadership breathed new life into the movement. [=gave new energy to the movement]

6 [no obj] : to feel able to think or act freely
I need some room to breathe. = I need some breathing room/space.

7 [no obj] a : to allow air to pass through
a fabric that breathes
b : to be cooled or refreshed by air that passes through clothing
Cotton clothing lets your skin breathe.

8 [+ obj] : to say (something) very quietly
It’s beautiful, she breathed.usually used in the phrase breathe a word Don’t breathe a word of/about this to anyone! [=do not say anything about this to anyone]

9 [no obj] of wine : to develop a better flavor because of contact with air
Open the bottle a few minutes before you want to drink it so that the wine can breathe.

breathe a sigh of relief

: to relax because something you have been worrying about is not a problem or danger anymore : to feel relieved
We all breathed a sigh of relief when we heard that they were safe.
breathe down someone’s neck

1 : to chase after someone closely
The cops were breathing down our necks.

2 : to watch someone carefully and constantly
His parents are always breathing down his neck.

breathe easy or breathe easier or breathe easily or breathe freely

: to feel relief from pressure, danger, etc.
I’ll breathe easier once this whole ordeal is over. You can breathe easy knowing that your children are safe.
breathe your lastsee 4last
live and breathe

If you live and breathe something, you spend a great deal of time, thought, or effort on that thing.
She lives and breathes music. They live and breathe their work.
breath·able Listen to audio /ˈbri:ðəbəl/ adjective [more breathable; most breathable]
a breathable fabric [=a fabric that allows air to pass through]
— breathing noun [noncount]
Her breathing is heavy/shallow/labored.often used before another noun We’ll begin with some breathing exercises. He has breathing problems.see also heavy breathing at 1heavy
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