Publicaciones de la categoría: fce

Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern

Other Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern:

Base Form  Past Simple  Past Participle
Burn Burnt/Burned Burnt/Burned
Clap Clapped/Clapt Clapped/Clapt
Dream Dreamt/Dreamed Dreamt/Dreamed
Kneel Knelt/Kneeled Knelt/Kneeled
Lean Leant/Leaned Leant/Leaned
Leap Leapt/Leaped Leapt/Leaped
Smell Smelt/Smelled Smelt/Smelled
Spell Spelt/Spelled Spelt/Spelled
Spill Spilt/Spilled Spilt/Spilled
Spoil Spoilt/Spoiled Spoilt/Spoiled
Strip Stript/Stripped Stript/Stripped
Sunburn Sunburned/Sunburnt Sunburned/Sunburnt
Sweep Swept/Sweeped Swept/Sweeped
Vex Vext/Vexed Vext/Vexed
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Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern

Other Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern:

Base Form  Past Simple  Past Participle
Burn Burnt/Burned Burnt/Burned
Clap Clapped/Clapt Clapped/Clapt
Dream Dreamt/Dreamed Dreamt/Dreamed
Kneel Knelt/Kneeled Knelt/Kneeled
Lean Leant/Leaned Leant/Leaned
Leap Leapt/Leaped Leapt/Leaped
Smell Smelt/Smelled Smelt/Smelled
Spell Spelt/Spelled Spelt/Spelled
Spill Spilt/Spilled Spilt/Spilled
Spoil Spoilt/Spoiled Spoilt/Spoiled
Strip Stript/Stripped Stript/Stripped
Sunburn Sunburned/Sunburnt Sunburned/Sunburnt
Sweep Swept/Sweeped Swept/Sweeped
Vex Vext/Vexed Vext/Vexed

Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern

Other Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern:

Base Form  Past Simple  Past Participle
Burn Burnt/Burned Burnt/Burned
Clap Clapped/Clapt Clapped/Clapt
Dream Dreamt/Dreamed Dreamt/Dreamed
Kneel Knelt/Kneeled Knelt/Kneeled
Lean Leant/Leaned Leant/Leaned
Leap Leapt/Leaped Leapt/Leaped
Smell Smelt/Smelled Smelt/Smelled
Spell Spelt/Spelled Spelt/Spelled
Spill Spilt/Spilled Spilt/Spilled
Spoil Spoilt/Spoiled Spoilt/Spoiled
Strip Stript/Stripped Stript/Stripped
Sunburn Sunburned/Sunburnt Sunburned/Sunburnt
Sweep Swept/Sweeped Swept/Sweeped
Vex Vext/Vexed Vext/Vexed

Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern

Other Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern:

Base Form  Past Simple  Past Participle
Burn Burnt/Burned Burnt/Burned
Clap Clapped/Clapt Clapped/Clapt
Dream Dreamt/Dreamed Dreamt/Dreamed
Kneel Knelt/Kneeled Knelt/Kneeled
Lean Leant/Leaned Leant/Leaned
Leap Leapt/Leaped Leapt/Leaped
Smell Smelt/Smelled Smelt/Smelled
Spell Spelt/Spelled Spelt/Spelled
Spill Spilt/Spilled Spilt/Spilled
Spoil Spoilt/Spoiled Spoilt/Spoiled
Strip Stript/Stripped Stript/Stripped
Sunburn Sunburned/Sunburnt Sunburned/Sunburnt
Sweep Swept/Sweeped Swept/Sweeped
Vex Vext/Vexed Vext/Vexed

Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern

Other Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern:

Base Form  Past Simple  Past Participle
Burn Burnt/Burned Burnt/Burned
Clap Clapped/Clapt Clapped/Clapt
Dream Dreamt/Dreamed Dreamt/Dreamed
Kneel Knelt/Kneeled Knelt/Kneeled
Lean Leant/Leaned Leant/Leaned
Leap Leapt/Leaped Leapt/Leaped
Smell Smelt/Smelled Smelt/Smelled
Spell Spelt/Spelled Spelt/Spelled
Spill Spilt/Spilled Spilt/Spilled
Spoil Spoilt/Spoiled Spoilt/Spoiled
Strip Stript/Stripped Stript/Stripped
Sunburn Sunburned/Sunburnt Sunburned/Sunburnt
Sweep Swept/Sweeped Swept/Sweeped
Vex Vext/Vexed Vext/Vexed

Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern

Other Irregular Verbs Following a Similar Pattern:

Base Form  Past Simple  Past Participle
Burn Burnt/Burned Burnt/Burned
Clap Clapped/Clapt Clapped/Clapt
Dream Dreamt/Dreamed Dreamt/Dreamed
Kneel Knelt/Kneeled Knelt/Kneeled
Lean Leant/Leaned Leant/Leaned
Leap Leapt/Leaped Leapt/Leaped
Smell Smelt/Smelled Smelt/Smelled
Spell Spelt/Spelled Spelt/Spelled
Spill Spilt/Spilled Spilt/Spilled
Spoil Spoilt/Spoiled Spoilt/Spoiled
Strip Stript/Stripped Stript/Stripped
Sunburn Sunburned/Sunburnt Sunburned/Sunburnt
Sweep Swept/Sweeped Swept/Sweeped
Vex Vext/Vexed Vext/Vexed

Semicolon Rules

Semicolon Rules
The following rules and examples will help you know when and where to use the semicolon as a punctuation mark.

  • Use a semicolon to combine two very closely related complete sentences.
    Toni Morrison uses parabolic storytelling in her writing; she seldom writes in a linear mode. Many people believe the state quarters released from the United States Mint will be valuable someday; although this is possible, the coins may also turn out to be worth no more than their actual value of 25 cents.

  • Use a semicolon along with a conjunctive adverb and a comma to clarify the relationship between two closely related complete sentences. Conjunctive adverbs include however, therefore, in addition, moreover, subsequently, consequently, instead, and additionally.
    The Leaning Tower of Pisa is in danger of falling over; however, engineers are trying to stabilize its foundation. The Five Nations respects the abilities of all its people; therefore, both women and men participate in making tribal decisions.

  • Use a semicolon to separate a series of phrases or clauses that are long or have punctuation, like commas, within them.
    In Walden, Henry David Thoreau encourages individuals to find their own way of life rather than conforming to the ideas of others; to seek the truth and beauty of life in nature; and to learn about themselves and the world by experiencing life instead of just studying it. The University’s community outreach committee was led by three individuals: Erica Hunt, a full-time student; Dave Woods, a Center for Information Media administrator; and Joyce Wilkins, a business professor.

Semicolon Rules

Semicolon Rules
The following rules and examples will help you know when and where to use the semicolon as a punctuation mark.

  • Use a semicolon to combine two very closely related complete sentences.
    Toni Morrison uses parabolic storytelling in her writing; she seldom writes in a linear mode. Many people believe the state quarters released from the United States Mint will be valuable someday; although this is possible, the coins may also turn out to be worth no more than their actual value of 25 cents.

  • Use a semicolon along with a conjunctive adverb and a comma to clarify the relationship between two closely related complete sentences. Conjunctive adverbs include however, therefore, in addition, moreover, subsequently, consequently, instead, and additionally.
    The Leaning Tower of Pisa is in danger of falling over; however, engineers are trying to stabilize its foundation. The Five Nations respects the abilities of all its people; therefore, both women and men participate in making tribal decisions.

  • Use a semicolon to separate a series of phrases or clauses that are long or have punctuation, like commas, within them.
    In Walden, Henry David Thoreau encourages individuals to find their own way of life rather than conforming to the ideas of others; to seek the truth and beauty of life in nature; and to learn about themselves and the world by experiencing life instead of just studying it. The University’s community outreach committee was led by three individuals: Erica Hunt, a full-time student; Dave Woods, a Center for Information Media administrator; and Joyce Wilkins, a business professor.

Semicolon Rules

Semicolon Rules
The following rules and examples will help you know when and where to use the semicolon as a punctuation mark.

  • Use a semicolon to combine two very closely related complete sentences.
    Toni Morrison uses parabolic storytelling in her writing; she seldom writes in a linear mode. Many people believe the state quarters released from the United States Mint will be valuable someday; although this is possible, the coins may also turn out to be worth no more than their actual value of 25 cents.

  • Use a semicolon along with a conjunctive adverb and a comma to clarify the relationship between two closely related complete sentences. Conjunctive adverbs include however, therefore, in addition, moreover, subsequently, consequently, instead, and additionally.
    The Leaning Tower of Pisa is in danger of falling over; however, engineers are trying to stabilize its foundation. The Five Nations respects the abilities of all its people; therefore, both women and men participate in making tribal decisions.

  • Use a semicolon to separate a series of phrases or clauses that are long or have punctuation, like commas, within them.
    In Walden, Henry David Thoreau encourages individuals to find their own way of life rather than conforming to the ideas of others; to seek the truth and beauty of life in nature; and to learn about themselves and the world by experiencing life instead of just studying it. The University’s community outreach committee was led by three individuals: Erica Hunt, a full-time student; Dave Woods, a Center for Information Media administrator; and Joyce Wilkins, a business professor.

Semicolon Rules

Semicolon Rules
The following rules and examples will help you know when and where to use the semicolon as a punctuation mark.

  • Use a semicolon to combine two very closely related complete sentences.
    Toni Morrison uses parabolic storytelling in her writing; she seldom writes in a linear mode. Many people believe the state quarters released from the United States Mint will be valuable someday; although this is possible, the coins may also turn out to be worth no more than their actual value of 25 cents.

  • Use a semicolon along with a conjunctive adverb and a comma to clarify the relationship between two closely related complete sentences. Conjunctive adverbs include however, therefore, in addition, moreover, subsequently, consequently, instead, and additionally.
    The Leaning Tower of Pisa is in danger of falling over; however, engineers are trying to stabilize its foundation. The Five Nations respects the abilities of all its people; therefore, both women and men participate in making tribal decisions.

  • Use a semicolon to separate a series of phrases or clauses that are long or have punctuation, like commas, within them.
    In Walden, Henry David Thoreau encourages individuals to find their own way of life rather than conforming to the ideas of others; to seek the truth and beauty of life in nature; and to learn about themselves and the world by experiencing life instead of just studying it. The University’s community outreach committee was led by three individuals: Erica Hunt, a full-time student; Dave Woods, a Center for Information Media administrator; and Joyce Wilkins, a business professor.
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